Ravine

A ravine is a landform narrower than a canyon and is often the product of streamcutting erosion.[1] Ravines are typically classified as larger in scale than gullies, although smaller than valleys.[1] A ravine is generally a fluvial slope landform of relatively steep (cross-sectional) sides, on the order of twenty to seventy percent in gradient. Ravines may or may not have active streams flowing along the downslope channel which originally formed them; moreover, often they are characterized by intermittent streams, since their geographic scale may not be sufficiently large to support a perennial watercourse.[2] A ravine is a deep valley which is formed due to linear/dendritic fluvial erosion of loose unconsolidated and bare soils byes.[3]

Other terms for ravine include

  • cleuch
  • dell
  • ghost (Nevis)
  • gill or ghyll
  • glen
  • gorge
  • Gravina in Puglia
  • kloof (South Africa)
  • chine (Isle of Wight)

References / notes[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Definition of "ravine" at Merriam-Webster.
  2. Christopher G. Morris; Academic Press (1992). Academic Press Dictionary of Science and Technology. Gulf Professional Publishing. pp. 1802–. ISBN 978-0-12-200400-1. Retrieved 1 October 2012. 
  3. Ravine. Wikipedia: The free encyclopedia. Accessed 5 November, 2017.

Glossary of terms and customs[edit]

This page forms part of our glossary of words and phrases of the Armed Forces of the United Kingdom of Great Britain during the Great War, which also includes: technicalities, trench slang, expressions in everyday use, nicknames, sobriquets, the titles and origins of British and Commonwealth Regiments, and warfare in general. Please feel free to help expand and improve this content.
Browse other terms: ContentsA B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z