Salvo

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A salvo is the simultaneous discharge of artillery or firearms including the firing of guns with the purpose of hitting a target or in the performing of a salute. Troops armed with muzzleloaders required time in which to refill their arms with gunpowder and shot. Gun drills were designed to enable an almost continuous rain of fire on the enemy by lining troops into ranks, allowing one rank to fire a salvo, or volley, while the other ranks prepared their guns for firing.[1]

See also Barrage and Box barrage.

References / notes[edit]

  1. Salvo. Wikipedia: The free encyclopedia. Accessed 20 April, 2017.

Glossary of words and phrases[edit]

The above term is listed in our glossary of words and phrases of the Armed Forces of the United Kingdom of Great Britain during the Great War, which also includes: technicalities, trench slang, expressions in everyday use, nicknames, sobriquets, the titles and origins of British and Commonwealth Regiments, and warfare in general. These words and phrases are contemporary to the war, which is reflected in the language used, and have been transcribed from three primary sources (see contents). Feel free to help improve this content.
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