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Trenchcoat

The home of the Lonsdale Battalion 1914-1918
Not to be confused with Greatcoat.

A trenchcoat or trench coat is a raincoat made of waterproof heavy-duty cotton gabardine drill, leather, or poplin. It generally has a removable insulated lining, raglan sleeves, and the classic versions come in various lengths ranging from just above the ankles (the longest) to above the knee (the shortest). It was originally an item of clothing for Army officers (developed prior to the war but adapted for use in the trenches of the First World War, hence its name) and shows this influence in its styling.

Traditionally this garment is double-breasted with 10 front buttons, has wide lapels, a storm flap and pockets that button-close. The coat is belted at the waist with a self-belt, as well as having straps around the wrists that also buckle (to keep water from running down the forearm when using binoculars in the rain). The coat often has shoulder straps that button-close; those were a functional feature in a military context. The traditional colour of a trench coat was khaki, although newer versions come in many colours.[1]

References / notes[edit | edit source]

  1. Trench coat. Wikipedia: The free encyclopedia. Accessed 19 April, 2017.

Glossary of words and phrases[edit source]

The above term is listed in our glossary of words and phrases of the Armed Forces of the United Kingdom of Great Britain during the Great War, which also includes: technicalities, trench slang, expressions in everyday use, nicknames, sobriquets, the titles and origins of British and Commonwealth Regiments, and warfare in general. These words and phrases are contemporary to the war, which is reflected in the language used, and have been transcribed from three primary sources (see contents). Feel free to help improve this content.
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