Billet

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A Billet has several definitions, however, primarily the term was used denote a soldier (or soldiers) quarters in a private house and various other civilian buildings. It also included less desirable shelter such as barns, outbuildings and even temporary shelters. A billet is also an official order, verbal or in writing, that directs the addressee of households and inns etc., to provide their lodgings for military personnel. Also familiarly, a job, a position and/or appointment, e.g., Staff billet.[1]

References / notes[edit]

  1. Edward Fraser and John Gibbons (1925). Soldier and Sailor Words and Phrases. Routledge, London p.22.

Glossary of terms and customs[edit]

This page forms part of our glossary of words and phrases of the Armed Forces of the United Kingdom of Great Britain during the Great War, which also includes: technicalities, trench slang, expressions in everyday use, nicknames, sobriquets, the titles and origins of British and Commonwealth Regiments, and warfare in general. Please feel free to help expand and improve this content.
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