2/4th Battalion - Annual Inspection Reports

Inspection Reports[edit]

60px 5th July, 1915

The men are cheerful and work well and keenly. In spite of the numerous Station duties, the Battalion should be fit for service in another four months after completion of musketry training.

A contented spirit pervades all ranks. A good, useful Battalion.

(Signed)
H. T. BROOKING, C.B.,
Brigadier-General,
Commanding Poona Brigade and Divisional Area.


60px A satisfactory report.

Adjutant-General for Commander-in-Chief in India.
30th September, 1915

A satisfactory report.

Adjutant-General for Commander-in-Chief in India.
15th November, 1916.


60px 8th Feb. 1917

The Regiment is fit for war and well trained in all branches. Their fire and discipline will now be tested on the Mohmand Blockade Line. The efficiency of the Battalion has improved since last year. Officers and men work well. The interior economy is good.

(Signed)
L. C. DUNSTERVILLE, C.B., A. B.C.,
Brigadier-General,
Commanding the Peshawar Infantry Brigade.


60px The officers and non-commissioned officers are competent, and their standard of efficiency as commanders is rising. The rank-and-file are physically a fine body of men, well behaved, and keen. The Battalion shows marked improvement since coming into the Division five months ago. It is now on the Mohmand Blockade Line, and is reported to me by the General commanding there to be taking its place satisfactorily in the Brigade. I consider credit is due to Lieut.-Colonel Haswell for the satisfactory condition of the Battalion. It is fit for active service.

(Signed)
SIR F. CAMPBELL, K.C.B., D.S.O.,
Major-General,
Commanding 1st (Peshawar) Division.


60px I have not seen this Battalion at field training. It has a fine, smart, well-turned-out body of men, and a keen lot of officers, so that it ought to do well.

(Signed)
A. A. BARRETT,
Lieut.-General,
Commanding Northern Army. 25th June, 1917.


60px A very satisfactory report.

Adjutant-General in India for Commander-in-Chief in India.
6th March, 1918.


60px 20th Feb. 1918.

This Battalion is well trained, and has attained a high standard of efficiency. Drill is very steady and smart, and work on manoeuvre particularly good. All details of training are thoroughly and carefully attended to. The officers as a whole are very zealous, and possess considerable knowledge of their work. The men are keen, well disciplined, and show a A very good spirit. Taking the pre-war standard of a Regular Battalion as 100, I fix the standard of this Battalion as 85. Interior economy satisfactory. Fit for service.

(Signed)
G. D. CROCKER,
Brigadier-General,
Commanding Peshawar Infantry Brigade.


60px A well-commanded, well-officered unit. The rank-and-file are steady ; movement is brisk. All ranks take an interest in training matters. The standard attained is high, and a very good tone exists throughout. Fit for service.

(Signed)
SIR F. CAMPBELL, K.C.B., D.S.O.,
Lieut.-General,
Commanding 1st (Peshawar) Division.


60px I was much pleased with what I saw of this Battalion during Brigade training. The men are very quick movers across country, and all ranks give evidence of having been carefully instructed.

(Signed)
A. A. BARRETT,
General,
Commanding Northern Command.
27th May, 1918.


60px A very satisfactory report.

Adjutant-General for Commander-in-Chief in India.
April, 1919.


60px 28th Jan. 1919.

Instruction and training in all subjects is carried out very thoroughly. The instructors are particularly capable and up to date, and the men are keen. Drill is steady and smart, and work on manoeuvres very good. A well-organised and efficient Battalion. The officers have a good knowledge of their work, and take an interest in it. The men are well disciplined, keen, and anxious to do well. I have a high opinion of this Battalion. It is fit for service. Interior economy satisfactory.

(Signed)
G. D. CROCKER,
Brigadier-General,
Commanding 1st Infantry Brigade.


60px A very well-disciplined Battalion. All ranks take a pride in maintaining a soldierly bearing. I have always had confidence in this unit as being well trained, a valuable asset in the Division, and as being one which would always do creditably in the field. This view I maintain. Fit for service.

(Signed)
SIR F. CAMPBELL, K.C.B., D.S.O.,
Commanding 1st (Peshawar) Division.



Inspection Reports by the Inspector of Infantry (Northern)[edit]

60px June, 1917.

I was most favourably impressed throughout by all the work I saw. Training is being carried out on very sound lines. Great attention is paid to detail, and reflects great credit on all concerned.


60px
LETTER FROM GENERAL STAFF IST (PESHAWAR) DIVISION TO THE G.O.C. IST (PESHAWAR) INFANTRY BRIGADE ENCLOSING ABOVE.

In forwarding a copy of the report of the inspection of the 2/4th Border Regiment by the Inspector of Infantry Northern, I am to request that you will convey to the Officer Commanding the Battalion the pleasure it gives the Divisional Commander to receive this excellent report.

20th August, 1917.


60px July, 1918.

I only saw Headquarters and two Companies, the other two Companies being on Detachment in the 1st Division. I was satisfied with the standard of training reached, and all ranks appeared keen.


60px 3rd January, 1919.

This is a very well trained Battalion, which is the more creditable as it has been much split up, and in places where there was not good ground. The men are particularly pleasant spoken and keen to do well. They are very well turned out, and the N.C.O.'s particularly are exceedingly smart and well taught. It would be difficult to find a battalion with a better spirit or more anxious to do well.


60px
LETTER FROM THE ARMY COUNCIL.

23rd April, 1915.

Sir,

I am commanded by the Army Council to request that your Excellency will be good enough to inform the Officer Commanding 2/4th Border Regiment that the Council have been glad to receive a good report of the discipline and conduct of the Battalion during the accident to H.M.T. Donyola on the 5th March last, and during its subsequent transfer to another ship.

I am, Sir,
Your obedient Servant,
(Signed) B. B. CUBITT.


60px
To His Excellency the Commander-in-Chief in India, Army Headquarters, India.

COPY OF A LETTER FROM HIS EXCELLENCY THE COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF IN INDIA TO OFFICERS, NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS AND MEN OF THE 2/4TH (CUMBERLAND AND WESTMORLAND) BATTALION THE BORDER REGIMENT:

On your departure from India, I desire to place on record my high appreciation of your services to the Empire during the period of the Great War.

Many of you previous to the outbreak of war had, by joining the Territorial Force, already given proof of that patriotism and public spirit for which the Force has rendered itself so conspicuous.

On the declaration of war your ranks were quickly filled by eager volunteers, animated by the same spirit of self-sacrifice ; when called upon to undertake the further obligation of service overseas your response was immediate and unanimous. By so doing you set free a large number of Regular units for service in the main theatres of war, at a time when every trained soldier was of the greatest value.

I share with you the disappointment, which I know you all feel so keenly, that it has not been your luck to fight the enemy in Europe. Many of you, however, have seen service on the Indian Frontier, and by your conduct and bearing have added to the reputation of the famous regiments whose names you bear.

For the greater portion of your service in India you have been engaged in the somewhat dull routine of garrison duty. The standard of efficiency which you attained, both in training for war and in discipline, reflects the highest credit on you all.

Since the termination of active fighting in all the theatres of war you have been subjected to the further stress of waiting for your relief. That you have appreciated the difficulties which the authorities have had to face in this respect is clear from the patience with which you have borne this trying period.

You are now returning to your homes in the United Kingdom, and I bid you good-bye, God-speed, and a happy hoine-coining.

As an old commander of a Territorial Division at home, I am proud to have again been associated with this Force in India.

(Signed)
C. C. MUNBO, General,
Commander-in-Chief in India.


60px June 18th, 1920.

The Thanks of the Government of India, inscribed on vellum, were received in England.



Composition of Battalion[edit]

COMPOSITION OF BATTALION, 4th MARCH, 1915.
The N.C.O.'s and men wlio sailed for India in March, 1915, were recruited from the following districts in Cumberland and Westmorland:
Carlisle and District 338
Keswick and Brampton 70
Penrith and District 95
Milnthorpe, Appleby, Kirkby Lonsdale, &c. 86
Kendal, Staveley, and Burneside 83
Winder mere, Ambleside, and Langdale 53
Various 42
Total
767

Miscellaneous[edit]

REGIMENTAL ANNUAL MUSKETRY RETURN. Table B, Part III.
Year 1915-16
1916-17
1917-18
1918-19
Average
81.2
109.3
127.14
111.3
Marksmen
2
141
457
211
1st Class Shots
78
312
264
471
2nd Class Shots
377
235
22
98
Failed in Part I
138
22
6
2
Failed in Part III
124
13
2
29
Partly exercised
11
2
15
20
Not exercised
20
27
16
12
750
752
782
843
Year
Best Shooting Coy.
Average Score
Battalion Shot
1915-16
“A” Company
85.4
Pte. Park, “A” Company
1916-17
“B” do
122.7
Cpl. Tyson, “B” Company
1917-18
“B” do
137.54
Pte. Stainton, “A” Company
1918-19
“A” do
118.5
L/Cpl. Robinson, “A” Company
For the Musketry Year 1917-18 the Battalion was the best shooting battalion with the 1914 rifle in India.


60px
EXTRACT FROM BATTALION ORDERS OF 24TH JANUARY, 1915.

The Commanding Officer has much pleasure in publishing for information that C.Q.M.S. Earl, T., of this Battalion, has been awarded by the Royal Humane Society a Testimonial on Vellum for having on the 28th November, 1914, gone to the rescue of a woman who was in imminent danger of drowning in the river at Kendal, and whose life he gallantly saved.


60px ASSOCIATION FOOTBALL

The Battalion team were runners-up for the Murray Cup, 1918 (open to all India).

The following were won: Peshawar Divisional Cup, 1919. Williams Challenge Cup, 1919 (open to all India).