Record of the XIth (Service) Battalion (Lonsdale) - Appendix E

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Record of the XIth (Service) Battalion (Lonsdale) - Sept 1914 to Jul 1916 Home icon black.png

In England (prelude to war)  ·   In France (war diary extracts)  ·   Note for Officers/N.C.O.'s  ·   Report on Night Raid  ·   Bde. Operation Order No.45  ·   Battalion Orders
Instructions from C.O.  ·   Message re Zero Time  ·   Casualties  ·   Honours & Awards  ·   Officers & N.C.O.'s  ·   Press Appeciations

Final notes and instructions from Commanding Officer to O.C. Companies[edit]

    Objective first day is 2nd line.
    Platoon Commanders select strong point.
    Dig in whenever halt.

None go back as long as can stick out. Shells in wood and on emerging, also our front line. All not hit must push on. Must do our job. If all goes well, I stay proper place; if goes badly, I come up and see it through.[1]

D Coy. + 20’
B Coy. + 25’
A Coy. + 30’
C Coy. + 35’

No sooner than + 20’, because barrage lifts off C and H at +18’ (wire cutting map). Distance 1½ miles, heavily loaded. Barrage lifts off D’s object at 1-18’. This gives 1 hour margin on safe side, allow for opening out and extending—possible check.

  • B 25’ - To be on Int. line 1-30’ - have to go left, open, extend, &c., to allow A to get out in time.
  • C 35’ - Very Heavily loaded—go as soon after A as possible.
Bombardment
6-25'
Zero
7-30'
Coy. dep C Strokes
+ 15'
7-45'
Coy. dep D
+ 20'
7-50'
Coy. dep B
+ 25'
7-55'
Coy. dep A
+ 30'
8-00'
Coy. dep C
+ 35'
8-05'
Barrages
A
lifts at…
0
B
3'
C
18'
D
28'
E
52'
F
1-18'
G
1-35'
H
18'

Hurricane bombardment by Stokes just before assault.

  • Important — Stokes carriers and D do not check early, so that A and B may arrive at Int. line in time. On arrival quick consolidate, and O.C. send reports.
  • Water (special) in paraffin tins in Authuille Wood.[2]

References / notes[edit]

  1. Things did go badly and he did "come up and see it through" when he made his way to the British front line after seeing his men cut down by machine-gun fire. Col. Machell was true to his word and was killed upon climbing the parapet.
  2. Tin baths full of water were also placed in the wood but were speedily shelled to pieces.